• Treatment for Chlamydia

    Treatment for chlamydia may involve the following:
    MedicationsLifestyle changes
    For chlamydial STI, it is important that you and your partner both be treated and wait at least 7 days before you have sex again. All of the medicine must be taken as directed; this is critical to curing your infection. The US Centers for Disease Control has endorsed a form of partner-treating known as “expedited partner therapy (EPT)” if your partner will not likely seek treatment. If your state and doctor support EPT, you may be given a prescription to give to your partner. They can then be treated without needing to seek medical attention. Where it is allowed, EPT can help reduce the spread of chlamydia.
    If you still have symptoms after the medicine is finished, you may need to be tested again. Even if your symptoms disappear, you are encouraged to return 3 months after treatment to be retested. It is possible for you to develop drug resistance or reactions, have re-infection, or for the infection to spread to other organs.
    It is standard practice to test for multiple STIs when identifying one infection. It is also standard practice to treat for chlamydia when gonorrhea is identified.


    British Association for Sexual Health and HIV guideline: 2006 UK national guideline for the management of genital tract infection with chlamydia trachomatis. British Association for Sexual health and HIV(BASHH) . 2006.

    Chlamydia fact sheet. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/STDFact-Chlamydia.htm . Updated Feburaray 8, 2012. Accessed October 6, 2012.

    Chlamydia genital infection. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php . Updated September 7, 2012. Accessed October 6, 2012.

    Chlamydia. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases website. Available at: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/chlamydia/understanding/Pages/cause.aspx . Updated August 20, 2010. Accessed October 6, 2012.

    Chlamydia. National Women's Health Organization website. Available at: http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/chlamydia.cfm . Updated July 8, 2011. Accessed October 6, 2012.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2010. MMWR 2010;59(No. RR-12):1-110.

    Miller KE. Diagnosis and treatment of chlamydia trachomatis infection. Am Fam Physician . 2006;73:1411-1416.

    Revision Information

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